I have a lot of opinions. My new years resolution is to own a cat.

Posts Tagged: books

sprezzaturalife:

babylassiter:

baseballtimemachine:

Litographs - entire books printed on shirts

YOU ARE TELLING ME I CAN READ MY T SHIRT

SHUT UP AND TAKE MY MONEY

HOLYSHITHOLYSHITHOLYSHITHOLYSHITHOLYSHIT

HOTDAMN WHY DON’T I HAVE THIS

Source: the-englishroses

"You get a little moody sometimes but I think that’s because you like to read. People that like to read are always a little fucked up."

- Pat Conroy, The Prince of Tides (via consideringlily)
Source: jaymediane

Source: theincurablebibliophile

jujukitten:

RIP Maurice Sendak (June 10, 1928 – May 8, 2012).

jujukitten:

RIP Maurice Sendak (June 10, 1928 – May 8, 2012).

(via respectacles)

Source: jujukitten

"

There’s a lot of anger, but people don’t know what they’re angry about. You know, from the end of the Vietnam War all the way up to 9/11, for the most part everyone was fat, dumb and happy. Then 9/11 happened and shattered all that. People became scared and anxious and out of control. They’d go to Wal-Mart and realize that everything they’ve been buying says ‘Made in China.’ They see the complete ineptitude of the federal government during Hurricane Katrina. They see some guy [Bernie Madoff] within the shadow of the SEC running a $50 billion scam - and who the hell is watching out for their $10,000 IRA? And then the banks melt down, the auto industry is taken over, and we pass this huge stimulus. All of this builds up and they’re saying, ‘What the hell can I possibly do about a $14 trillion national debt?’

But then it gets to health care. And they’re saying, ‘That’s me. That’s mine. It’s the first big issue that’s personalized. And that’s why we’re getting all this pent-up frustration and anger. Because when you explain the bill to ‘em, they say, ‘Well that doesn’t sound too bad.’ But it doesn’t matter. All their anger is focused on this, because it’s personal.

Madam Speaker, what you need to do is break the bill down. Have a bill that covers preexisting conditions. Pass that - or make the Republicans vote against it - and then move onto another part. But you do this omnibus approach, they won’t know what the hell’s in it. And they’ll keep yelling at it.

"

-

Rep. John Tanner (D-TN), to Nancy Pelosi in August 2009, on the Affordable Care Act. This quote is from Robert Draper’s Do Not Ask What Good We Do: Inside the U.S. House of Representatives.

I think there are varying degrees of truth here, depending on 1) where you land on the political spectrum, and 2) how much faith you have in the collective mindset of the American people.

I think the biggest downfall of the Affordable Care Act is the length of time between its passage and when the final, major provisions take effect. That’s a 10-year spread. It’s bittersweet, of course, because ACA is a massive undertaking that likely needs a full decade to enact. However, the longer it takes for provisions to take into effect - and the less effort the administration puts into promoting and notifying the public about said provisions - the more likely opponents will succeed in dismantling the legislation. The point could be moot now, since the Supreme Court may rule the legislation, or at least the individual mandate, unconstitutional.

I’m not so confident that breaking the bill into several pieces of legislation would ultimately give us as many provisions as the omnibus does now, but I don’t doubt that this strategy may have made the public more aware of what the legislation contains. Would there still be angry people? Of course. I just think there’d be less vague outrage (“Government takeover, death panels and socialism, oh my!!”) and more tailored, specific grievances against provisions that are supposedly freedom-denying, liberty-hating government initiatives.

(via pantslessprogressive)
Source: pantslessprogressive

"‘The world must be all fucked up,’ he said then, ‘when men travel first class and literature goes as freight.’"

- One Hundred Years of Solitude, Gabriel Garcia Marquez (via thefengshuiislovely)

(via respectacles)

Source: thefengshuiislovely

"These are all major accomplishments, and we librarians have every right to be proud of them. But the world is moving on. Each of the services we’ve provided in the digital arena has been — or is being — superseded by new and better technologies or by other organizations better suited to deliver services electronically. And when Google has finished its scanning project, it will have no more use for us or our collections either. So after more than 50 years in the digital market, libraries have come right back to where they started. Our dream of an electronic library has been built, but others own and manage it. We are left with the tangible property we began with, our physical books, the thousands of buildings that house them, and the millions of people still coming through our doors to use them. In reality, those are not inconsiderable assets — especially in a world where it may become increasingly uneconomical to have physical bookstores or places where people can get together to listen to stories or discuss books and ideas. Figuring out how to exploit those assets in this new environment will not be easy. Perhaps we should turn our attention away from the electric library that others have built and focus on the real books and buildings that made us what we were to begin with. Perhaps that will continue to define us into the future. Or perhaps not. Perhaps we have new roles to play in the digital world or old roles to play but in a new way. Let’s think about that."

- FEATURE: The Decline and Fall of the Library Empire (via infoneer-pulse)

The day a virtual library becomes a legit place to hang out, or goof off with friends is the day physical libraries truly die. Information alone is only so valuable, after all.

(via futurejournalismproject)

(via futurejournalismproject)

Source: infotoday.com

infinitelyclassier:

OMG LIBRARIES

infinitelyclassier:

OMG LIBRARIES

(via infinitelyclassier-deactivated2)

Source: utnereader

npr:

The Unlikely Best-Seller: ‘A Wrinkle In Time’ Turns 50
Imagine, for a moment, that you’re a publisher hearing a pitch about a children’s book whose tangled plot braids together quantum physics, fractions and megaparsecs (a measure for distances in intergalactic space). The book also casually tosses out phrases in French, Italian, German and ancient Greek. Sound like the next kids’ best-seller to you?
It didn’t to the many publishers who rejected Madeleine L’Engle’s A Wrinkle in Time, which turns 50 this year. The novel was an immediate hit with young readers and with critics when it was published, and it won the Newbery Medal in 1963. Since then, it has remained a beloved favorite of children and adults alike.
But it almost didn’t see the light of day. At the time, L’Engle already had six books to her name, but publishers were perplexed by her latest. 

These were some of my very favorite children’s books. I re read them occasionally, still good.

npr:

The Unlikely Best-Seller: ‘A Wrinkle In Time’ Turns 50

Imagine, for a moment, that you’re a publisher hearing a pitch about a children’s book whose tangled plot braids together quantum physics, fractions and megaparsecs (a measure for distances in intergalactic space). The book also casually tosses out phrases in French, Italian, German and ancient Greek. Sound like the next kids’ best-seller to you?

It didn’t to the many publishers who rejected Madeleine L’Engle’s A Wrinkle in Time, which turns 50 this year. The novel was an immediate hit with young readers and with critics when it was published, and it won the Newbery Medal in 1963. Since then, it has remained a beloved favorite of children and adults alike.

But it almost didn’t see the light of day. At the time, L’Engle already had six books to her name, but publishers were perplexed by her latest. 

These were some of my very favorite children’s books. I re read them occasionally, still good.

Source: NPR

"

And on the subject of burning books: I want to congratulate librarians, not famous for their physical strength or their powerful political connections or their great wealth, who, all over this country, have staunchly resisted anti-democratic bullies who have tried to remove certain books from their shelves, and have refused to reveal to thought police the names of persons who have checked out those titles.

So the America I loved still exists, if not in the White House or the Supreme Court or the Senate or the House of Representatives or the media. The America I love still exists at the front desks of our public libraries.

"

- Kurt Vonnegut, A Man Without a Country  (via honeyforthehomeless)

(via theoccasionalitalic)

Source: honeyforthehomeless

BETTER YOUR BRAIN: Amanda Reads Books 2012

betteryourbrain:

I finished my first two books of 2012 today, Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas and The Fault In Our Stars. In my quest to keep track of and read at least 100 books this year, I need to finish one book every 3.65 days (or one book every 87.6 hours) which comes out to 1.92 or approximately 2 books a…

Finished: A Bad Idea I Am About To Do by Chris Gethard. Hilarious and quick. 

Source: betteryourbrain

"Now a book lives as long as it is unfathomed. Once it is fathomed, it dies at once. It is an amazing thing, how utterly different a book will be, if I read it again after five years. Some books gain immensely, they are a new thing. They are so astonishingly different, they make a man question his own identity. Again, other books lose immensely. I read War and Peace once more, and was amazed to find how little it moved me, I was almost aghast to think of the raptures I had once felt, and now felt no more."

- From Apocalypse by D.H. Lawrence. Via Biblioklept. (via bookoflead)
Source: bookoflead

BETTER YOUR BRAIN: Amanda Reads Books 2012

betteryourbrain:

I finished my first two books of 2012 today, Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas and The Fault In Our Stars. In my quest to keep track of and read at least 100 books this year, I need to finish one book every 3.65 days (or one book every 87.6 hours) which comes out to 1.92 or approximately 2 books a…

Also finished Nine Stories by JD Salinger and The Miseducation of Cameron Post by Emily Danforth. Way behind on my books, I know. I have so much else to do! This is stressful.

Source: betteryourbrain

BETTER YOUR BRAIN: Amanda Reads Books 2012

betteryourbrain:

betteryourbrain:

I finished my first two books of 2012 today, Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas and The Fault In Our Stars. In my quest to keep track of and read at least 100 books this year, I need to finish one book every 3.65 days (or one book every 87.6 hours) which comes out to 1.92 or approximately 2 books a…

I’m reblogging this to update it.

I have since read Full Frontal Feminism by Jessica Valenti, A Tale of Two Cities by Dickens, and The Beats: A Graphic History.

FFF wasn’t really eye opening or anything but it was funny and well written. She does a great job explaining some of the biggest problems women face and how to combat institutionalized sexism in other women. I enjoyed it and would definitely recommend it to anyone looking for some basic feminist literature to educate themselves.

I’m a fan of Dickens but a Tale of Two Cities was not my favorite. His prose is beautiful, but the book dragged on and on and his tendency to have static characters made it worse. The ending, of course, was brilliant.

The Beats: A Graphic History was delightfully drawn and narrated, I learned a lot about individuals of the Beat generation that I hadn’t looked into much before. If you like the era or comic books, it’s a good one to check out; my only complaint is that it’s organized pretty poorly. 

I know I’m still behind on my reading, shut up.

Finished another, Partly Cloudy Patriot by Sarah Vowell.

It’s a collection of essays on everything from family to patriotism to TR and it was as if she was inside my head rearranging my thoughts and mirroring them back to me on paper. I have to get something else by her immediately. 

Source: betteryourbrain