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Posts Tagged: technology

What everyone who uses the internet needs to know about CISPA

think-progress:

Here’s a quick look at the Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act, with the full details at ThinkProgress.

  • CISPA’s broad language will likely give the government access to anyone’s personal information with few privacy protections.
  • The bill completely exempts itself from the Freedom of Information Act.
  • CISPA gives companies blanket immunity from future lawsuits.
  • Companies can already inform the government and each other about incoming cybersecurity threats.
  • Most Republicans support CISPA, while most Democrats oppose it, and President Obama threatened to veto it.
  • The internet is fighting back.
Source: think-progress

"These are all major accomplishments, and we librarians have every right to be proud of them. But the world is moving on. Each of the services we’ve provided in the digital arena has been — or is being — superseded by new and better technologies or by other organizations better suited to deliver services electronically. And when Google has finished its scanning project, it will have no more use for us or our collections either. So after more than 50 years in the digital market, libraries have come right back to where they started. Our dream of an electronic library has been built, but others own and manage it. We are left with the tangible property we began with, our physical books, the thousands of buildings that house them, and the millions of people still coming through our doors to use them. In reality, those are not inconsiderable assets — especially in a world where it may become increasingly uneconomical to have physical bookstores or places where people can get together to listen to stories or discuss books and ideas. Figuring out how to exploit those assets in this new environment will not be easy. Perhaps we should turn our attention away from the electric library that others have built and focus on the real books and buildings that made us what we were to begin with. Perhaps that will continue to define us into the future. Or perhaps not. Perhaps we have new roles to play in the digital world or old roles to play but in a new way. Let’s think about that."

- FEATURE: The Decline and Fall of the Library Empire (via infoneer-pulse)

The day a virtual library becomes a legit place to hang out, or goof off with friends is the day physical libraries truly die. Information alone is only so valuable, after all.

(via futurejournalismproject)

(via futurejournalismproject)

Source: infotoday.com

"I remember fondly the days when we were all tickled pink by our elected officials’ struggle to understand how the internet works. Whether it was George W. Bush referring to “the internets” or Senator Ted Stevens describing said internets as “a series of tubes,” we would sit back and chortle at our well-meaning but horribly uninformed representatives, confident that the right people would eventually steer them back on course. Well I have news for members of Congress: Those days are over.

We get it. You think you can be cute and old-fashioned by openly admitting that you don’t know what a DNS server is. You relish the opportunity to put on a half-cocked smile and ask to skip over the techno-jargon, conveniently masking your ignorance by making yourselves seem better aligned with the average American joe or jane — the “non-nerds” among us. But to anyone of moderate intelligence that tuned in to yesterday’s Congressional mark-up of SOPA, the legislation that seeks to fundamentally change how the internet works, you kind of just looked like a bunch of jack-asses."

Source: futurejournalismproject

"Social networks exist to sell you crap. The icky feeling you get when your friend starts to talk to you about Amway, or when you spot someone passing out business cards at a birthday party, is the entire driving force behind a site like Facebook…

…We have a name for the kind of person who collects a detailed, permanent dossier on everyone they interact with, with the intent of using it to manipulate others for personal advantage - we call that person a sociopath. And both Google and Facebook have gone deep into stalker territory with their attempts to track our every action. Even if you have faith in their good intentions, you feel misgivings about stepping into the elaborate shrine they’ve built to document your entire online life."

-

Maciej Ceglowski, the Pinboard Blog. The Social Graph is Neither.

A brilliant essay about technology’s failure to create and harness a true social graph.

(via futurejournalismproject)
Source: futurejournalismproject

futurejournalismproject:

Just two weeks ago we were impressed with Jesse Anderson’s announcement that he’d written an application that mimicked a million monkeys typing and it had successfully written Shakespeare’s A Lover’s Complaint.

Now fast forward and Anderson claims his digital primates have successfully recreated all of Shakespeare’s works.

Via Anderson:

The monkeys accomplished their goal of recreating all 38 works of Shakespeare. The last work, The Taming Of The Shrew, was completed at 2 AM PST on October 6, 2011. This is the first time every work of Shakespeare has actually been randomly reproduced. Furthermore, this is the largest work ever randomly reproduced. It is one small step for a monkey, one giant leap for virtual primates everywhere. This page shows what day each work of Shakespeare was completed on.

this is fucking cool as hell

Source: futurejournalismproject

"It is clear that for many of our members two websites would make things more difficult, so we are going to keep Netflix as one place to go for streaming and DVDs. This means no change: one website, one account, one password… in other words, no Qwikster."

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Reed Hastings • In a very short post on the Netflix blog about the about-face his company did regarding Qwikster. He added: “While the July price change was necessary, we are now done with price changes.” That’s all you needed to say. (via kohenari)

well thank god

(via kohenari)

Source: blog.netflix.com

The Energy Department defied Republican critics Friday by announcing that it had committed an additional $4.7 billion in loan guarantees toward four big-dollar clean technology projects just hours before the program’s funding expired.

climateadaptation:

This is definitely worth your time.

read it.

Source: climateadaptation

"Can U.S. companies be held liable if foreign governments use their products for repression?"

-

Two lawsuits by three Chinese dissidents and a human rights group accusing Cisco Systems Inc. of abetting imprisonment and torture could have far-reaching impact on how U.S. technology companies conduct business in authoritarian regimes.

The lawsuits filed in May and June target a second technology company for complicity in human rights abuses in China after Yahoo Inc. in 2007 paid to settle a case in which it was accused of aiding the prosecution of dissidents.

The lawsuits are drawing broad attention from U.S. companies because these are important test cases of the Alien Tort Claims Act, a law dating back to 1789 that accommodates actions in U.S. courts to uphold international law.

So … perhaps we’ll soon see about an answer to the above question. It all seems pretty clear to me, given the specifics of the complaint against Cisco, but then again I’m someone who generally seeks to promote the idea of universal human rights …

Much more here (HT: Dave Forsythe).

(via kohenari)

(via kohenari)

Source: Yahoo!

kohenari:


Maps + Mashups + Conflicts + History = Conflict History
Part amazing, part depressing, Conflict History is a Google Maps timeline mashup that lets you browse from past to present to learn about the world’s conflicts.
The screenshot above shows 2001-2010. Selecting the Info icon on the left gives background information on the conflict with additional links to related materials. The slider on the bottom brings you forward and back in time.
For example, we just learned about the Sicilian Wars of 600 to 264 BCE.
Most of the content is pulled from Wikipedia and Freebase, a Creative Commons licensed data source.

If you have an interest in political science, international relations, inter- or intra-state conflict, or history, my guess is that you could spend a whole lot of time playing with the above website. Enjoy!

THIS IS AMAZING. I spent almost 4 hours straight the other day just playing with it.

kohenari:

Maps + Mashups + Conflicts + History = Conflict History

Part amazing, part depressing, Conflict History is a Google Maps timeline mashup that lets you browse from past to present to learn about the world’s conflicts.

The screenshot above shows 2001-2010. Selecting the Info icon on the left gives background information on the conflict with additional links to related materials. The slider on the bottom brings you forward and back in time.

For example, we just learned about the Sicilian Wars of 600 to 264 BCE.

Most of the content is pulled from Wikipedia and Freebase, a Creative Commons licensed data source.

If you have an interest in political science, international relations, inter- or intra-state conflict, or history, my guess is that you could spend a whole lot of time playing with the above website. Enjoy!

THIS IS AMAZING. I spent almost 4 hours straight the other day just playing with it.

Source: futurejournalismproject

New Google Ngram: trace words through their evolution

Text

shortformblog:

squashed:

Text message are also out. At least, it is in Cairo.

Shutting off the Internet is not a move made by a government that’s comfortable with its grip on power.

You may want to pay attention to this. This is the sort of thing that could go 1989 Berlin Wall or 1989 Tienanmen Square very quickly. Unfortunately, it’s anybody’s guess which it will be.

This is extremely worrying. This is the act of a desperate government losing control. Let your thoughts be with Egypt tonight.

(via shortformblog)

Source: squashed